Check the Sisters of the Winter Wood

At first glance, the town of Dubossary seems to be a simple Jewish town on the edge of the forest. Pious and cheerful villagers frolic in the snow, go to the market and celebrate Shabbas together. But for the sisters Liba and Laya, who live in the woods outside the city, it’s not as idyllic as they seem. Strange sounds and the sounds of wandering strangers suddenly make life in the forest a little less hospitable. Maybe the folk tales are true?


When Liba and Laya’s parents visit a dying man in several cities, they reveal two big secrets to the girls. Both parents are Shapeshifters – and so are you. Liba inherited her father’s bear figure and dark features; Laya had her mother’s worldly beauty and light hair. These changes begin to manifest themselves when the feelings of each sister meet, the boys, Tradition and attempt collide. While Laya is tempted by a group of young foreigners, Liba knows that it is up to her to protect her sister and, if necessary, to invite the swan people to defend her and her sister from everything that hides in the forest.

A choice of style of its own distinguishes the sisters of the Winter Forest by Rena Rossner from all other stories that meet legends. Liba’s perspective is written in prose and secular poetry. Throughout the book, the differences between liba’s steadfast and loyal nature and Laya’s rebellious and strong-willed character are played out wonderfully, because the two styles used by Rossner perfectly reflect the feelings of each sister. I was particularly attracted by Laya’s airy but intense chapters, which seemed to pass in the blink of an eye.


Equally intriguing is the way Rossner evokes the feeling of breaking the strict rules that govern the Sisters’ existence. Dubossar’s identity is based on a very strict interpretation of Orthodox Judaism, which prohibits men and women from bodily calling each other before being in a relationship. When Liba thinks only of the natural thoughts of an 18-year-old woman, the reader makes his way through Rossner’s prose. This contradictory feeling is reinforced by the uncontrollable transformations that each sister begins to undergo, a moving and painful representation of what we feel growing up.


Rossner’s family came to America to deal with the pogroms and hatred of Eastern European Jews. She recalled in the author’s (highly recommended) remark that she had heard her grandmother’s voice in her head while she was writing The Sisters of the Winter Forest. This story has a lived-in popular feeling, a mystical and threatening glow that cannot be shaken. Basically, however, this is a Novel about two sisters who love and understand each other in a difficult period of life. And fortunately, we can take this wonderful and strange journey with you. Rossner the sisters of the Winter Forest is a dreamlike Ode to brotherhood, Mythology and family that you cannot leave.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *